Sunday, 24 September 2017

September Wrap-Up: #BookReviews of September #BookHaul

Oh, I read some great books in September! So, I'm just going to get to reviewing them for you now.




I really enjoyed Lauren's Oliver's Delirium earlier this year, and was happy to see the sequel, Pandemonium in my local library.


This is a YA dystopian trilogy, and I was really excited to see what happened in Pandemonium, especially after the heart-stopping ending to Book 1.

So, a little about Book 1 (because I can't tell you anything about Book 2 without spoiling you): 

Love is seen as a disease in this dystopian world, but there is a surgical procedure which is thought to cure you. Well, prevent you from contracting this deadly illness, prevent you from falling in love.

But what if you're already in love before your procedure takes place?

What would you do?

Read this trilogy and find out! Book 1 was really good, the writing was clever and so beautiful ~ I highly recommend it for YA dystopia fans, as well as anyone who reads teen/YA fiction. My review of Delirium is in my May Wrap-Up post.

My Rating for Pandemonium: 4-stars

I enjoyed this sequel as much as the first book. It's structured differently to Book 1, and I liked this format as much as the structure of the first book. This book is definitely more fast-paced, as you'd expect in a sequel, because you've already gotten to know the characters' back-story and personality pretty well in the series starter. The writing is just as good, there's character development and change, twists and turns... I kept reaching for the book whenever I had to put it down and do something else.

Highly, highly recommend this series if you read YA/teen fiction or dystopia.

The other book I'd been dying to read is Home by Harlan Coben.


Home is the 11th book in the Myron Bolitar series, my favourite crime series of all time. So, of course I'd been itching to get my hands on it, especially since I read a little preview of it in Fool Me Once, by the same author (though not from the Myron Bolitar series), earlier this year.

If you're interested in my review of Fool Me Once, you can find it in my March Wrap-Up post.

A little background on this bestselling series:

Myron Bolitar is a sports agent that also ends up investigating and solving crimes, from murders and missing persons to entrapment of dangerous gangsters. He has a great sidekick/best friend that helps him out, who is one of my favourite thriller characters ever. His name is Win Lockwood, short for Windsor Horne Lockwood III, but don't be fooled by the title ~ Win is a serious badass.

But things have changed quite a bit now, 11 books into the series, so I was eager to see how everything turned out.

My Rating: 5-stars

This is only my second 5-star rating this year. It. Was. That. Good. And I've read some pretty good books this year. The mystery that had to be solved in this book was so cleverly crafted, so well executed, and of course, pulled at the heartstrings, too. That's one of the things that sets apart Harlan Coben's crime thrillers from the rest ~ the emotion, the heart.

And not to mention the wit and comedy, the amazing chemistry between Myron and his friends, particularly Win.

Ah, Win.

Love this character. I don't think I'd find it easy to love Win as a person in real life ~ on paper, he has a lot of issues and faults and makes some decisions that most people would disapprove of and frown upon, including me. But as fictional characters go, he is one of my favourites and one of the best I've ever read. I don't think every lead character or sidekick has to be likeable and be a good role model, as long as they're well developed and make for an entertaining read. Win is definitely that.

I so loved the ending scene in this book, and I wish I could discuss it with you, but I can't. All I will say is that if you haven't started this series yet, do it. What are you waiting for?

I also spotted the third book in the Mickey Bolitar series in the library, Found, also by Harlan Coben ~ I read book 2, Seconds Away, last month (review here).


Mickey is Myron's 16-year-old nephew, and like his uncle, he has a thing for investigating the mysterious, helping the needy.

Playing the hero.

In Seconds Away, I found him to be just as likeable as Myron, and I was interested to see what kinds of trouble he got into in the third book in this spin-off series.

It is a YA series, but Harlan Coben's fans will enjoy it too. Well, I certainly enjoyed Seconds Away.

I really enjoyed Found, too.

My Rating: 4-stars

I found myself flying through this book. Harlan Coben's books are hard to put down, and this was no different. As this is the third in the series, again, I can't really say much about the plot, only that I found it riveting. There were lots of little things going on, but they were woven together perfectly, and the ending... Wow. I do hope we will see more of Mickey in the future.

So, as I was in bit of a crime/thriller mood in September, thanks to Harlan Coben, I thought I'd catch up on one of the paperbacks on my personal bookshelf, and finally get around to reading...

I Am Pilgrim by Terry Hayes


I purchased this book a while back from WHSmiths (I had some book tokens leftover from years ago; I'd won them at a poetry competition in my teens) and had planned to read it earlier in the year (perhaps in my first Book Haul post), but I didn't get around to it. Lately, I've found myself procrastinating when it comes to books and e-books that I own, favouring the books I borrow from the library because of the limited amount of time I have to read them.

I Am Pilgrim was a huge success when it came out and I believe it's a complex thriller? I do like starting books with little knowledge of the plot and so on, preferring to discover everything as the characters do. With thrillers, I think it's better to go into them blind. So that's what I planned to do.

However, if you'd like to learn more about this book, and the others in this post, just click on the book name above the cover image and it'll take you to the corresponding Goodreads page.

Unfortunately, I didn't get around to reading this book, so no review, I'm afraid. Like I mentioned above, I've been really bad about reading books that I own. Hopefully, I'll get around to picking it up soon. Or eventually.

Lord of Shadows (The Dark Artifices #2) by Cassandra Clare


I downloaded this highly anticipated sequel to Lady Midnight on my iPhone (on iBooks) and was really looking forward to getting stuck in. Cassandra Clare fans are loving this series, and I'd heard great things about this book, so I didn't want to wait any longer to read it.

From the cover, I got the feeling that it was going to get a lot darker in this book. I really enjoyed the first book in the Dark Artifices series, which of course is a part of the Shadowhunter Chronicles, so I was keen to see how things pan out in this book. The ending to Lady Midnight hinted at so much....

I would normally tell you a little about Lady Midnight, but it's not that simple: The Dark Artifices series is a follow-on series to the Mortal Instruments series, taking place after the events of the 6th and final book in that series. Plus, there was another series, the Infernal Devices series ~ almost like a prequel series, but not quite, to the Mortal Instruments series ~ that also has to be read before starting this series. So it's hard to set the scene for Lord of Shadows.

All I can say about Lady Midnight is that, writing-wise, it felt like the most accomplished of Clare's work. Read my review of Lady Midnight in my April Wrap-Up post.

My Rating for Lord of Shadows: 5-stars

So, this is now only the third time so far this year that I've rated something 5-stars, and boy does this book deserve it. If I could give it 6 out of 5, I would. Or 7, or 8. It had everything, and I loved it.

Lady Midnight was great, but Lord of Shadows is better. I don't know how the length of this book compares to its predecessor ~ I read Lady Midnight in hardback form, and Lord of Shadows in e-book format, but whereas Lady Midnight was a big long book and felt that way, and I found that it started off slowly, Lord of Shadows felt too short, like I should have dragged it out longer, not because it was rushed or anything, and the pacing was perfect.

I got more invested with the characters in this book and I liked how they developed and matured. And the added focus on the secondary characters, especially Ty and Kit, I really liked.

I should have guessed I'd like this book more than Book 1, as I've noticed a pattern with me and Cassandra Clare books: I always seem to like the second book in her series more than the rest. City of Ashes was my favourite from the Mortal Instruments series, Clockwork Prince was the one I enjoyed most of the Infernal Devices series, and now Lord of Shadows.

I just hope that the other pattern isn't repeated with the Dark Artifices series ~ the final books in Cassie Clare's series are the ones I always seem to enjoy least and struggle with; it happened with City of Heavenly Fire (TMI) and Clockwork Princess (TID) ~ because I am really looking forward to the third book in the Dark Artifices series and I don't want to be left underwhelmed. I believe Queen of Air and Darkness (The Dark Artifices #3) isn't going to release for a couple more years, though...

Stone of Fire (ARKANE #1) by J.F. Penn


I downloaded this free series starter from Amazon on my Kindle App. This series is billed as 'Dan Brown meets Tomb Raider', or something like that, which, in my opinion, can't be a bad thing. I like Dan Brown. I liked the Tomb Raider films, and if it's as good as everyone's saying, then I thought that should really like this one, because I do like my Dan Brown-style thrillers.

Unfortunately, I couldn't finish this book because every time I tried to read it, my Kindle App froze, so I couldn't flip to the next page, or the screen went black. That's never happened before, and I don't know what caused this strange malfunctioning because my iPhone was working fine as usual. I tried on a few different days to launch this e-book on my Kindle App but the same issues occurred. Then, I because I'm a wuss, I decided not to try an read any more books on my Kindle App for a while, so not to end up breaking my phone.

Now, I have a quick announcement to make. I don't expect to do a book haul in October, because I don't know if I'll be able to read enough books to justify such a post. Those of you that read my Q&A post on If I Say Yes (Love & Alternatives #1) a few weeks back will remember me telling you that I'm expecting my first baby in November. I know, congratulations to me ;) The official due date is November 20, and so I'll be quite busy preparing for the baby in October and November.

And then busy with the baby thereafter.

However, I will be posting new content on my blog every Monday in the next couple of months (I've written a few articles in preparation for my 'maternity leave from blogging'), and I'll review any books I end up reading as and when I can.

As for 2018... It's going to be a hectic year. I'm both nervous and excited about it, but one thing I know for sure is that writing and blogging will have to take a backseat for a while. Babies take over your life, everyone keeps telling me, so I'm expecting just that :)


Thank you for reading this post. If you're interested in my debut novel, click the image below to learn more about it:




Like all my other books, it's also available on:
iBooks   |   B&N Nook   |   Kobo |   Smashwords 


Book Details

Length: 110,000 words
Genre: Contemporary Romance / Clean Romance / Diverse Romance / Interracial Romance / Romantic Drama / Women’s Fiction

Mood: Inspirational / Feel Good / Coming of Age / Dark
Content: Sexy but No explicit sex scenes / No erotica
Audience: New Adult & College / Adult / Female Readers

Recommended for: Readers that enjoy romance novels with serious issues and characters with depth. This is a story about life, love, friendship, family, music, art, destiny and soul mates.


And the first two books in my teen urban fantasy/YA paranormal romance series, the Poison Blood series, can be downloaded for free via:

Amazon US|  Amazon UK|   iBooks US UK   |   B&N Nook Store   |   Smashwords







PB1 Book Details
Length: 29,000 words
GenreYA Paranormal Romance / Teen Vampire Romance / Young Adult Paranormal Fantasy / Teen & YA Urban Fantasy / Young Adult Science Fiction & Fantasy / Supernatural Romance / Fantasy Romance
Mood: Dark / Humorous / Coming of age
Content: No violence / No explicit sex scenes / No erotica
Audience: Teen / Young Adult / New Adult / Adult
Recommended for: Readers that love all things related to the Chosen One, vampires, slayers and witches!



By signing up to my mailing list, you will receive e-mails when I run free or discounted book offers and news on any new/upcoming releases.

Wednesday, 20 September 2017

Adultery in Fiction – Do You Approve? Many Don't...



Adultery is wrong. Personally, I think cheating is one of the worst things a loved one can do to you. The pain it causes, the lives it ruins, the leftover broken trust and inability to trust again, and so much more... I wouldn't wish it on an enemy.

But it does happen. All the time. In all corners of the world.

A study in 2015 revealed that 45% of British men admitted to betraying their spouse or partner at least once, with 32% of women confessing to the same. 

Rather high percentages! No wonder writers of all genres tackle the issue of infidelity in their books one time or another. Sometimes it's the main conflict in the novel, sometimes it's on the periphery. It's very tempting to include a sub-plot focusing on a main character's past or present indiscretions. A 'will-they-won't-they-be-caught/found-out' situation.

Adultery, in some shape or form, has featured in the majority of the books I've read in the last few years. I didn't seek out these books based on the content - they just happened to include a cheater or two. I didn't take offence at the inclusion of this topic. If it made the story more gripping, more entertaining, then I didn't mind it. And I didn't think anyone else would be bothered by the subject matter either.

Until the last few months.

I've been using Goodreads quite a bit recently. Skimming through reviews of books I've read and ones I'm interested in getting my hands on, I've realised that novels featuring cheaters are a huge turn-off for certain readers. Maybe I'm really naive, or hadn't read enough reviews of books including infidelity, but I was shocked by the extent to which certain people hated books in which the hero or heroine cheat on their partners. 

Regardless of how good they thought the writing was, or how the story ended (i.e. if the adulterer learned the error in their ways and made amends), these readers wrote very negative (almost troll-like) reviews and gave those books really low ratings (mostly just 1-star) because of the adultery. Some of these reviewers said that they stopped reading the book once the cheating storyline began. One vowed never to read a book by the same author again, whereas another said they would stop reading one of their favourite authors because one of their books dealt with infidelity! These reviews got tons of 'Likes' and comments agreeing with the reviewers' sentiments.

Of course, it's their choice, their right, to stop reading a certain book or author, but for a while, I was quite taken aback by this attitude. I've mentioned already that I don't discriminate against authors and books based on adulterous characters, but many obviously do. I've noted a number of comments where readers say that they won't even pick up a book if there is a cheating plot-line in it. One even stated that they prefer books in which the hero and heroine have never had previous relationships with anyone else and don't have subsequent ones with others after meeting each other.

If I narrowed down my preferences like that, I'd think I was missing out on some entertaining reads and good writers. I prefer to read an eclectic mix of books, featuring a wide range of characters that experience a variety of emotions and hardships. Sure, I might not enjoy the fact that a character that I've become attached to gets cheated on, but I don't stop reading because of it.

This doesn't mean I approve of adulterers, in the same way that reading lots of crime/murder mystery/detective novels doesn't mean I approve of murder or have a soft spot for criminals. If I think adultery is one of the worst crimes a human being can commit, then murder is the worst of all. But I still read about crime.

So this begs the question of whether readers that refrain from books about cheaters also refrain from reading crime fiction? Maybe they don't read crime novels, but if they do, I guess it could be argued that the hero in these books is the detective working 24/7 to catch the killer before they strike again. The murderer is the villain of the story, the antagonist.

So, why will certain people (like me) read books including cheaters while others won't? I don't know about you, but I read fiction for a number of reasons. The main ones are:

-Entertainment.
-Escape reality.
-Learn about what reality is for a lot of people around the world (and adultery happens in all corners of the planet).
-As a writer, I learn more about my craft by reading the works of others, improve my writing, grow my vocabulary and also find inspiration.

To be honest, I'd get bored reading about the same types of characters in the same kinds of stories, the goody-two-shoes that never make mistakes. Humans make mistakes all the time, some bigger than others, some with more disastrous consequences than most. And I wouldn't learn a whole lot about my profession if I kept reading the same-old, same-old.

When I discussed with my husband the negative reviews left on books where the characters cheat on their partners, he joked that some people might not like reading about adultery because it makes them insecure about their partners and they don't want to think about it happening to them. I don't know if he has a point, but I do know that it's tempting to believe that bad things that happen to others won't happen to us. A 'not-in-my-back-garden' belief.

But it would be inaccurate to say that insecurity is the main reason certain readers will steer clear of books featuring adulterous protagonists.

You might wonder whether I'm discussing a troll situation. Could be, but what if it isn't? What if a significant segment of the audience, especially of the romance genre, really won't read books with a cheating story-line? Should authors be cautious when taking their novels down those routes?

I don't think they should.

My opinion is that readers have a right to choose what they read and don't read, what they like and hate (hopefully you've noticed that I haven't been preaching to everyone to keep an open mind and read all kinds of stories). In the same way, authors can write what they want. With so many books out there, both print titles and indie e-books, writers are always trying different things, seeking original angles that will make their books stand out from the ever-growing crowd. If you remove the option of an adultery story-line from all your romance novels, especially if you plan to write loads of books, then you're left with one less way of diversifying your projects.

So, keep doing what you're doing, just bear in mind that you might lose a reader or two if you weave in a cheating scenario in your book.

Thank you for reading this post. If you'd like to check out my books, click on the links below:

Chasing Pavements is book 1 of my contemporary romance series, the Soulmates Saga, available to download from:

Amazon US|   Amazon UK|   iBooks   |   B&N Nook   |   Kobo |   Smashwords 



 

Book Details

Length: 110,000 words
Genre: Contemporary Romance / Clean Romance / Diverse Romance / Interracial Romance / Romantic Drama / Women’s Fiction

Mood: Inspirational / Feel Good / Coming of Age / Dark
Content: Sexy but No explicit sex scenes / No erotica
Audience: New Adult & College / Adult / Female Readers

Recommended for: Readers that enjoy romance novels with serious issues and characters with depth. This is a story about life, love, friendship, family, music, art, destiny and soul mates.


And the first two books in my teen urban fantasy/YA paranormal romance series, the Poison Blood series, can be downloaded for free via:

Amazon USAmazon UK|   iBooks US & UK   |   B&N Nook Store   |   Smashwords





PB1 Book Details
Length: 29,000 words
Genre: YA Paranormal Romance / Teen Vampire Romance / Young Adult Paranormal Fantasy / Teen & YA Urban Fantasy / Young Adult Science Fiction & Fantasy / Supernatural Romance / Fantasy Romance
Mood: Dark / Humorous / Coming of age
Content: No violence / No explicit sex scenes / No erotica
Audience: Teen / Young Adult / New Adult / Adult
Recommended for: Readers that love all things vampires, slayers and witches!





By signing up to my mailing list, you will receive e-mails when I run free or discounted book offers and news on any new/upcoming releases. 

Monday, 11 September 2017

Should Readers Finish A Book Before Leaving #BookReviews?


"The least I think you should expect of a book review is that the reviewer has actually read the book... I don’t think it is unreasonable to expect some kind of requirement for reviewers to have at least read a book before reviewing it."

You might think that the above statement was made by an indie author who is struggling to get reviews for their books in general, let alone positive reviews, and is reacting to a 1-star review posted on Amazon or Goodreads where a reviewer said they stopped reading their book after the first chapter/first couple of pages/without finishing the book. Right?

Wrong.

This is the opinion of established author Alex Gerlis, as expressed in the below article I came across recently:

http://www.curtisbrowncreative.co.uk/alex-gerlis-vienna-spies-spy-espionage-fiction/

Alex Gerlis was a BBC journalist for over 25 years, and left in 2011 to become a full-time author. He has three books out, and they've sold over 105,000 copies between them (as of June 2017). His novels have more than 1,300 Amazon reviews, with 85% of them being four- or five-star reviews. Alex therefore isn't short for reviews. A couple of 1-star ratings from readers that haven't finished his novels won't hurt him too much, and yet, he feels that it's unfair for a reader to post a review without finishing a book. So, you can't blame indie authors for holding the same opinion.

So, what do you think? Should it be mandatory for readers to actually finish a book before writing a review and leaving a low rating? Should there be a tick box in the review writing pane on Goodreads and Amazon that asks if the reader has finished the book, so that those reviews can be filtered out, or not taken into account when calculating the average rating?

Personally, I don't rate or review a book that I didn't finish reading, not on Amazon nor on Goodreads. In my May Wrap-Up post however, I had to name the books I couldn't finish that month due to the reading slump I was suffering from. I had no choice ~ I'd mentioned planning to read them in my May Book Haul post, and when it came to my monthly wrap-up, I had to explain why there were fewer reviews that month than in previous months. 

Nonetheless, I didn't rate/review these books on Goodreads or at any other retailer website, even though they were written by established authors who wouldn't have been too hurt by a 'I couldn't finish this book' review. That's just my personal choice, which I don't enforce on anyone.

I have however, noticed on Goodreads, a number of arguments (via the comments section on the book reviews), where some readers are insisting that because a certain reviewer hadn't read more than a couple of chapters of a book, they shouldn't have posted their review, shouldn't have rated that book with a 1-star, and ought not to have expressed such negative sentiments on the book. Those targeted reviewers stormed back, saying that it's their right to express their opinions on every book they start and rate/review it accordingly, whether they finish it or not. This argument was supported by many other Goodreads users.

I don't know what the percentage is, whether the majority believe in the former or the latter, but I have noticed a lot of reviews where the reader has rated a book with a 1-star and said they didn't finish it after a few pages/chapters. I don't think I've seen a single review where a reader just wrote that they didn't get past the first chapter (for whatever reason) and therefore didn't rate it.

I've seen a couple of reviews for my own works, where the reader rated it 1-star and said they couldn't finish it. I was fine with that. I didn't complain about it to anyone who'd listen. I didn't write a blog post ranting about the unfairness of it. I thought, "fair enough". It's the reader's right to express themselves. And, I'd want to know, wouldn't I, if a significant number of readers had the same experience with my book? So, that I could work on making the early pages stronger? 

There was a 1-star review for my Poison Blood, Book 1, where the reader stopped reading the book as soon as she learned about the main character's skin type and I wrote a post about that (click here for that post). I just found it strange that someone would dislike a particular skin type so much that they'd stop reading a book that they seemed to have enjoyed up until that point. They'd even complimented the writing quality, too! I guess it's a sensitive topic for me, discriminating against people because of their skin, seen as I've had to fight against racism and prejudices all my life because of my own skin colour. Even if I am considered to be 'fair-skinned', it's clear when you look at me that my ethnicity is of South Asian origin. 



Anyway, I myself don't rate/review books that I can't finish ~ does that mean that I, deep down, think it's unfair to rate/review a book (negatively) without finishing it? Or is it because I'm an author myself, I know how 1-star ratings and reviews affect our average ratings on Goodreads and Amazon, and don't feel comfortable doing that to a fellow author?

I don't knowI see merit in both arguments. I get Alex Gerlis's argument about powering through to the end of a book, because you can sometimes be rewarded. My favourite book of 2016 was A Court of Mist and Fury (ACOMAF) by Sarah J. Maas (see my Books I Read in 2016 post), the sequel to A Court of Thorns and Roses (ACOTAR).



I struggled through the first 50-60% of ACOTAR (book 1 in the series). It was also the first Maas book I'd read. I'm glad I powered through, though; I could so easily have given up on it. I came close to giving up on it a couple of times! If I hadn't pushed to the end, however, I'd have missed out on the thrilling conclusion to that book, because it finished really strongly. More that, I'd have missed out on reading what was to become my favourite book of that year, ACOMAF, which won the 2016 Goodreads Choice Awards in the YA Fantasy and Sci-Fi category.

And yet, I also agree that if a reader doesn't finish a book and wants to 'review' it, they shouldn't be criticised for doing so. People stop reading books early on for various reasons, the main book-related ones being:
  • Far too many spelling/grammatical errors in the first few pages.
  • The writing is rubbish in their opinion.
  • The book isn’t what they expected.
  • The book isn’t what they’re looking for.
  • The book isn't their cup of tea. 
Everyone has their own experiences, expectations and perspectives, and will act on those things accordingly. For example, one thing most of my readers say about my books, both the Poison Blood Series and the Soulmates Saga, is that they like the characters and the characterisation is very good, but a recent reviewer of Poison Blood, Book 1 stated that the characters/characterisation was what they disliked most and that aspect of the novel needed work. This same reader said that she couldn’t find fault with the plot, though, yet another reviewer a while back had said that the same book had no plot. See? It's not just that a book can't please all the people all the time, but also the fact that everyone has their own way of interpreting what they read, which is shaped by their experiences and expectations.



Then there's another school of thought, the believers of which would criticise me for not making clear what books I didn't finish, because these readers believe that every reader has a responsibility to future readers of that book, to let them know that this was one they couldn't finish, and for what reason, so as to help potential readers decide whether they want to start that book or not. This opinion, I find a bit iffy. Peoples' tastes and needs are different. Just because a bunch of readers struggled with a book, doesn't mean another bunch of readers won't get hooked on it. I think most readers know this, and so how much attention will they pay to the number of readers that didn't finish a book that they're seriously interested in reading? Not too much, I'd think.



One thing that most people agree on is that a review should be an honest account of how you felt about a book, its plot and themes, its characters and the writing. It shouldn't be a way for you to get back at, or lash out at, an author you have a personal vendetta against or because you took offence at something they said (e.g. writing a negative review for a Alex Gerlis book because you disagree with him saying that readers should finish a book in order to rate/review it). These types of reviews are easy to spot, actually ~ when it's a personal attack on the author ~ regardless of how the ulterior motive of the reviewer is disguised. So, don't do that. It's not cool.

Thank you for reading this post. If you're interested in my debut novel, click the image below to learn more about it:




Like all my other books, it's also available on:
iBooks   |   B&N Nook   |   Kobo |   Smashwords 


Book Details

Length: 110,000 words
Genre: Contemporary Romance / Clean Romance / Diverse Romance / Interracial Romance / Romantic Drama / Women’s Fiction

Mood: Inspirational / Feel Good / Coming of Age / Dark
Content: Sexy but No explicit sex scenes / No erotica
Audience: New Adult & College / Adult / Female Readers

Recommended for: Readers that enjoy romance novels with serious issues and characters with depth. This is a story about life, love, friendship, family, music, art, destiny and soul mates.


And the first two books in my teen urban fantasy/YA paranormal romance series, the Poison Blood series, can be downloaded for free via:

Amazon US|  Amazon UK|   iBooks US UK   |   B&N Nook Store   |   Smashwords





PB1 Book Details

Length: 29,000 words
GenreYA Paranormal Romance / Teen Vampire Romance / Young Adult Paranormal Fantasy / Teen & YA Urban Fantasy / Young Adult Science Fiction & Fantasy / Supernatural Romance / Fantasy Romance
Mood: Dark / Humorous / Coming of age
Content: No violence / No explicit sex scenes / No erotica
Audience: Teen / Young Adult / New Adult / Adult
Recommended for: Readers that love all things vampires, slayers and witches!





By signing up to my mailing list, you will receive e-mails when I run free or discounted book offers and news on any new/upcoming releases.